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THE

42nd Georgia

HISTORICAL DOCUMENT

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NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ON "SOCKS" FOR THE ARMY

 

THE MACON DAILY TELEGRAPH & CONFEDERATE - JANUARY 26, 1864:

DIRECTIONS FOR KNITTING SOCKS FOR THE ARMY - The following directions, which have been furnished by a lady of much experience, may prove useful to those who will engage in knitting woolen socks for the army. The yarn should be bluish grey. No. twenty-two, and the needles No. fourteen to fifteen:
Set twenty-seven stitches on each needle; knit the plain and two seam rows alternately until the ribbing is three inches long' then knit plain seven inches for the leg, remembering to seam one stitch at the end of one needle. To form the heel, put twenty stitches on two of the needles, and forty on the other - the seam stitch being in the middle. Knit the first row plain, the next row seam, and so alternately until the heel is three inches long, then narrow on the plain row each side of the of the seam stitch for five plain rows, which will leave thirty-one stitches. To close the heel, knit the last seam row to the middle of the needle, knit the seam stitch plain, then fold the two needles together, and with another needle take off the seam stitch. Then knit a stitch from both needles at once and bind the seam stitch over it. Continue knitting in this manner until but one is left and the heel closed. Take up as many stitches as there are rows around the heel; knit one row plain; then widen every fifth stitch on the heel needles. Narrow once on every round at each side of the foot needle, knit plain six inches; narrow at the beginning and end of each needle on every third round till you have seventeen stitches on each side; then narrow every round until the foot is closed. One pound of yarn, costing from seventy-five cents to one dollar, will furnish four pair of socks.

[On Microfilm - Genealogy Department - Main Branch, Fulton County Library, Atlanta, Georgia]


 


THE MACON DAILY TELEGRAPH & CONFEDERATE - FEBRUARY 8, 1864:

TO THE WOMEN OF GEORGIA.

STATE OF GEORGIA,
Quartermaster General's Office, }
Atlanta, Feb. 5th, 1864. }

A report has been put in circulation in various portions of the state that socks knit by the Ladies of Georgia for this Department, have been sold by me to the troops on the field. Without entertaining further into the details of this vile and malicious report, I hereby pronounce the whole tale to be a malicious FALSEHOOD. I deny, and challenge the world for proof to the contrary, that there has ever been a sock sold by this department to a soldier of the Confederate army since my first appeal to the women of Georgia to knit for their destitute defenders. I hereby bind myself to present ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS to any person, either citizen or soldier, who will come forward and prove that he ever bought a sock from this Department, that was either knit by the ladies or purchased for issue to said troops.

This report has been invented on the one handed by the enemies of our noble boys, who rejoice in their sufferings, and are delighted when they suspend the efforts of the noble women in their behalf. On the other hand, by servile opponents of the department, who forget that in venting their unprovoked spite upon us, they are causing the troops of their State to march over frozen ground and the drifting snow with uncovered and bleeding feet.

Women of Georgia! again I appeal to you. This time I call upon you to frown down these vile falsehoods. I demand of him who peddles the tale the evidence I call for above. Until that testimony is produced, I implore you stay not your efforts I assure you in the name of all that is holy and noble - on the honor of a man and an officer - that myself or any of my assistants have never sold a pair of socks that are knit by you. Every pair has been issued to the destitute troops as a gift, as about 17,000 gallant sons of the Empire State will gladly hear testimony.

Daughters of Georgia, I still need socks. Requisitions are daily pouring into me. I still have yarn to furnish you. I earnestly desire to secure a pair of socks for every barefooted soldier from Georgia. You are my only reliance. Past experience teaches me I will not appeal to you in vain.
IRA R. FOSTER
Quartermaster General of Ga.


[On Microfilm - Genealogy Department - Main Branch, Fulton County Library, Atlanta, Georgia]


 


THE MACON DAILY TELEGRAPH & CONFEDERATE - MARCH 8, 1864:

DALTON, March 8th, 1864.

MR. EDITOR: Permit me through the columns of your paper to return my thanks, and the thanks of my company, to the Rev. Josiah Martin, and the ladies of Decatur county Ga., for their liberal contributions of clothing.

Separated, as we have been, for several years from home and friends, it is doubly gratifying to be thus remembered by the patriotic ladies of the Confederacy.

We shall never fail to do all in our power for the glory of our government while stimulated by the thought that our hardships, and dangers meet the sympathy of a noble people, and while those who are not called on to share the fortunes of battle still urge us on by deeds of mercy and love.

The troops from our State in this Department have always tried to do their duty, and I can assure you that as regards my company, this act of kindness will be long remembered, and be a fresh inducement to continue faithfully in the discharge of all duties that may devolve upon them.
J. P. ANDREWS
Capt., Co. G, 7th Arks.


[On Microfilm - Genealogy Department - Main Branch, Fulton County Library, Atlanta, Georgia]


 


THE MACON DAILY TELEGRAPH & CONFEDERATE - MARCH 16, 1864:

TO THE LADIES OF BAINBRIDGE GEORGIA AND VICINITY - The members of the 7th Texas Infantry, Smith's Brigade, Cleburne's Division, army of Tennessee, who have recently been the fortunate recipients of 90 pair of socks, kindly donated them by the ladies of Bainbridge, take this method of returning their sincere thanks and grateful acknowledgments to those patriotic ladies, who have manifested so kind an interest and sympathy in their behalf.

[On Microfilm - Genealogy Department - Main Branch, Fulton County Library, Atlanta, Georgia]


 


THE MACON DAILY TELEGRAPH & CONFEDERATE - MARCH 28, 1864:

H'D. QRS. 1ST & 15TH REGT'S. ARK. VOLS.

NEAR DALTON, March 24th, 1864.

In the name of the soldiers of the 1st Ark. Regt., I take this method of tendering their sincere gratitude to Mrs. W. E. Little of Milledgeville, and Mrs. S. B. Marshall, Sr., of Eatonton, and the other fair ladies of Milledgeville, Eatonton, and of Putnam county, for their very acceptable donation of socks.

Many, many thanks to the fair donors for this kind manifestation of their patriotism and regard. The page of the historian has glowed with patriotic fire, while reciting the deeds of Roman matrons and Spartan Mothers. The poet, almost with the pen of inspiration, has portrayed in brilliant colors the self-sacrificing heroism of the women of "76." But we feel that we hazard nothing in saying, that the women of the South in the present revolution, stand among Roman matrons, Spartan mothers and the women of the first revolution, like the rose among flowers, the eagle among birds, and Washington among American heroes.

Ladies of our sunny land! Imitate the example of the fair ones of Putnam county; clothe the feet of the war-worn soldier, and by so doing you will nerve his arm, and kindle a fire of patriotism the army in that will burn up Lincoln and his hosts. And be assured that we honor you as the bright, particular star of our destiny. We admire you virtues and truly appreciate the generous qualities of your hearts. Your appropriate sphere:

"Is just on the boundary of the spirit land,
Close to the realms where angels have their birth."

Very Respectfully,
J. W. COLQUITT,
Col. Comm'dg. 1st & 15thArk. Regts.

[On Microfilm - Genealogy Department - Main Branch, Fulton County Library, Atlanta, Georgia

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(REVISED Friday, June 23, 2000 )

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